Deviated Septum: What is It, Causes, Treatment & Symptoms

Written By: Dr. Adel Chaouche

Dr. Adel Chaouche is an ENT Specialist in the Department of ENT ( Ear, Nose & Throat) at Medcare Women & Children Hospital, Dubai. He obtained his MBBS degree from the University of Constantine in Algeria and then went on to complete his MD. He commenced his career as an Assistant Professor and then became the Head of Department of the Head and Neck Cancer Department at the University Hospital in Constantine, Algeria.

Updated On:February 15, 2024

Read more.

blog

What is a Deviated Septum?

The cartilage and bone in your nose are called the nasal septum. The nasal cavity (inside your nose) is divided into a right and left side by the septum. The septum has "deviated" when it is out of alignment or leans to one side of the nasal cavity. Medics refer to this as a deviated nasal septum.

Some people have a deviated septum from birth. Others get it due to a nose injury. Headaches, congestion, and breathing issues could all be brought on by a severely deviated septum. A deviated septum can be fixed surgically.

Causes of Deviated Septum

A deviated septum can result from a nose wound. Nasal injuries could result from the following being involved in direct injury to the nose, which can happen in car accidents or sports.

Congenital, or present at birth, deviated septums are another possibility. The aberration could be the result of a challenging birth or a connective tissue disorder. It might also be the outcome of normal development. The septum expands along with the nose and occasionally tends to move to one side. Usually, the most frequent cause of a deviated septum is this.

Symptoms of Deviated Septum

The shape of the nose may change in people who have a significantly deviated septum. Additional signs of a deviated septum include the following:

  • Breathing difficulties on one or both sides of the nose
  • Discomfort in the face
  • Nasal blockage
  • Breathing loudly
  • Nosebleeds
  • Sinusitis
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Snoring

When to see a doctor for Deviated Septum?

Consult your healthcare practitioner if you experience symptoms that are affecting your quality of life or breathing difficulties. If you have a deviated septum, they can perform an examination to assess how severe it is.

Deviated Septum Risk Factors

Some people are born with a deviated septum, which can happen during fetal development or as a result of birth trauma. The most frequent postnatal cause of a deviated septum is an injury that shifts the nasal septum. Risk factors consist of taking part in contact sports and failing to fasten your seatbelt when traveling in a motor vehicle.

Deviated Septum Complications

A deviated septum that causes nasal obstruction might result in the following:

  • Dry mouth brought on by repeated mouth breathing
  • Nasal passageways that feel congested or pressured
  • Sleep disturbance brought on by the discomfort of having trouble breathing through your nose at night

Deviated Septum Diagnosis

A medical professional will start by asking you about your symptoms. They will examine you physically, which will include a careful inspection of your nose. They'll examine your nose's outside surface. By shining a strong light into your nostrils, they can also see within your nose. You could visit a specialist like a plastic surgeon or a doctor for the ears, nose, and throat (ENT).

Deviated Septum Treatment

The majority of people don't require deviated septum treatment since their symptoms are either nonexistent or minor.

Septoplasty

A surgical procedure known as a septoplasty is used to treat a deviated septum. A septoplasty can be an option for you if you experience breathing issues, recurrent sinus infections, or other irritating symptoms. You could be a candidate for a septoplasty if the symptoms of your deviated septum are severe. Your healthcare practitioner will assess your::

  • Septum
  • Age
  • Health
  • Risk factors
  • Existing medical conditions
  • Previous operations
  • Use of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco

A septoplasty typically takes one to two hours to do as an outpatient. You would return home on the same day. The septoplasty process consists of three basic steps:

  • Step 1 – Anesthesia: To make sure you're at ease, your surgeon will likely employ both local and general anesthetic. The area is numbed with local anesthetic. Throughout the surgery, general anesthesia puts you to sleep.
  • Step 2 – Repair: The membrane covering the septum is split by your surgeon. The distorted cartilage and bone are then removed by the surgeon. After that, your surgeon restores the membranes and stitches them back together.
  • Step 3 – Bandaging: Your surgeon might bandage your nose with gauze. Depending on your procedure, you can also have bandages on the outside of your nose.

Usually, doctors would conduct this procedure through the nose. However, sometimes a surgeon will additionally perform a rhinoplasty (commonly known as a "nose job," which reshapes the nose) or sinus surgery (to open the sinuses). Depending on your healthcare provider's advice, you would decide on the type of surgery.

Deviated Septum Prevention

Some people have a deviated septum from birth, and this cannot be prevented. If your septum was not deviated at birth, you can take precautions to lessen your chance of harm. Your nose can be shielded by using a helmet or face mask when engaging in sports, wearing your seatbelt, and staying away from physical sports.

To conclude, a deviated septum is prevalent. In most cases, symptoms are minimal or absent. Speak with your healthcare professional if you experience troublesome symptoms, such as snoring, face pain, headaches, congestion, or breathing problems.

References

Aaronson, N. L., & Vining, E. M. (2014, November). Correction of the deviated septum: from ancient Egypt to the endoscopic era. In International forum of allergy & rhinology (Vol. 4, No. 11, pp. 931-936).

Certal, V., Silva, H., Santos, T., Correia, A., & Carvalho, C. (2012). Trans-septal suturing technique in septoplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Rhinology50(3), 236-245.

Hwang, P. H., McLAUGHLIN, R. B., Lanza, D. C., & Kennedy, D. W. (1999). Endoscopic septoplasty: indications, technique, and results. Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery120(5), 678-682.

Kridel, R. W., Scott, B. A., & Foda, H. M. (1999). The tongue-in-groove technique in septorhinoplasty: a 10-year experience. Archives of facial plastic surgery1(4), 246-256.

Moore, M., & Eccles, R. (2011). Objective evidence for the efficacy of surgical management of the deviated septum as a treatment for chronic nasal obstruction: a systematic review. Clinical otolaryngology36(2), 106-113.

Meet our doctors from the Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) department

Mohamad I M El Naggar
MBBCh, MS, MD, FRCS (Eng)
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Egyptian
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Ghassan Younes
MBBS, MD
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Syrian
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Osama AlKadad
MD, MS, SC, FEBE-ORL, DOHNS (UK)
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Syrian
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Nisha Vijayan
MBBS,MS
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
English, Hindi, Malayalam
BOOK NOW
Mohammed Abdulazeez Hasan
MBchB, PhD
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Iraqi
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Kamel Sameer Dhay
Membership of the Royal college of Surgeons of England, MRCS ENT (London).
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Syrian
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Ravinder Verma
MBBS, MS, DNB
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
English, Hindi, Urdu
BOOK NOW
Thaer Dhaou
MBBS, MSc
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Syrian
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Saied Alhabash
Arab Board, European Board, Master
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Syrian
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Muhammad Jabbr
MD, MS, AFSA (France), DU (France), Arab Board, European Board, DOHNS(UK)
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Syrian
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Tarek Sallam
MBBS, MD
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Syria, Dominica
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Lekha Kawal Kapoor
MBBS, MS (ENT), DORL, DOHNS, MRCSEd (EDINBURGH UK), MSc Voice
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
Arabic, English, Gujarati, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Urdu
BOOK NOW
Adel Chaouche
MBBS, MD
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Algerian
Arabic, English, French
BOOK NOW
Manish Goyal
MBBS, M.S (ENT)
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
English, Gujarati, Hindi, Punjabi
BOOK NOW
Irshad Mazhar Mohiuddin
MBBS, DNB (ENT), FEBORL
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
Arabic, English, Hindi, Marathi, Urdu
BOOK NOW
Marwan Qasem
MBBCh, DO-HNS, The European Board of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, The Jordanian Board of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Jordanian
English, Arabic
BOOK NOW
Narayanan Janakiram
MBBS, MS (ENT), DLO
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
English, Hindi, Tamil
BOOK NOW
Amit Goel
MBBS, MS (ENT)
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
English, Hindi, Gujarati, Tamil
BOOK NOW
Seejo George
MBBS, MS (ENT), DLO
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
Indian
English, Hindi, Malayalam, Arabic
BOOK NOW
Faheem Alber Tadros
MBBCH, FRCS, ECFMG
Ear Nose and Throat (ENT)
British
Arabic, English
BOOK NOW
Similar Posts
Scroll Top